Workers’ compensation is a system created by the Georgia government to provide workers “immediate” income supplements and medical benefits as a result of an accident that occurred on the job. Many times people refer to the system as “workmen’s compensation”. However, given the fact that women make up a great portion of the work force, the term evolved to workers’ compensation.

Generally, the injuries need only be a result of claimant’s work duties. It is essentially a “no fault” system for the worker. However, workers’ compensation will be denied if the injured employee intentionally caused the accident or the injury was a result of the claimant’s intoxication (whether through alcohol or illicit substance).

If the injury happened in the course of employment, then the injured worker may be entitled to medical benefits, including prescription drugs, mileage reimbursement, and other routine items related to the needed care.

If the employee is not able to work, then he or she may be entitled to supplemental income benefits as determined by Georgia law. Generally, the income benefits will be a portion of the injured employee’s average weekly wage up to cap set by law. The injured worker would be entitled to receive this benefit until he can return to work or until she reaches the maximum benefit as allowed by the Georgia workers’ compensation statute.

Additionally, the claimant may be entitled to other benefits for the permanent impairment of the worker. This impairment is determined by the doctors by a “percentage rating” which is translated into a monetary value set by the Georgia law.

Most times, the injured workers are not well informed about their rights about workers’ compensation. These workers will find it helpful to contact an attorney for advice on their claim.